November 3, 2006

Congressionally called hearing on Textbook Costs

Posted in Student Loan News at 10:11 AM by Joe From Boston


This is an issue that I remember well… the costs of college textbooks. I spent several thousand dollars over the course of four years (and another several hundred in grad school) to buy required textbooks. One notable book, for Probability and Statistics cost $110 each, and if you opened the CD in the back of the book to use it, you could not sell it back to the bookstore. Ironic, eh? Why else buy the book with CD, but to use the CD? Then there were the 8 books for one Anthropology course that cost $8 to $18 dollars each.

I’m sure you all have similar stories!

That’s why the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance is holding a hearing into the cost of textbooks, at Congress’ request. From their press release:

The Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance will host a public hearing on Monday, Dec. 18, from approximately 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Student Service Building, Conference Room A/B, 1200 W. Harrison Street. This will be the first of three field hearings the Committee will hold as a part of its congressionally requested study to make textbooks more affordable for students.

In June 2006, U.S. Representatives Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (R-CA) and David Wu (D-OR) asked the Advisory Committee to conduct a study on the cost of college textbooks. The purpose of the study is three-fold: to investigate further the problem of rising textbook prices; to determine the impact of rising textbook prices on students’ ability to afford a postsecondary education; and, to make recommendations to Congress, the Secretary, and other stakeholders on what can be done to make textbooks more affordable for students.

The field hearings will include testimony from organizations and individuals around the country who are currently working to make textbooks more affordable. Information gathered will be used to inform recommendations in the final report, due to Congress by May 2007. For additional information on this study, please see the fact sheet posted on the Advisory Committee’s Web site at: http://www.ed.gov/ACSFA.

Anyone interested in attending the meeting must register in advance because space is limited. Please register at this website: http://www.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/acsfa/registration/edlite-index.html. Registration closes December 1, 2006. People interested in providing a public comment should include the following information when registering:

  1. Name
  2. Title, Organization
  3. Brief statement characterizing the nature of remarks you plan to provide at the hearing.

Each speaker will be allowed five minutes. Advisory Committee staff will contact speakers before the hearing to confirm the order in which comments will be provided. Written testimony is welcome.

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3 Comments »

  1. You actually make it seem so easy with your presentation but
    I in finding this topic to be really one thing which I
    believe I would by no means understand. It kind
    of feels too complex and extremely broad for me.
    I am having a look ahead to your subsequent put up, I will attempt to get the hang of it!

  2. Arlene said,

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    name along with your desired policy type. Why can’t it just be the same price as everything else. Today, you can come across a lot of websites with car insurance quotes for potential clients.

  3. mrs chelle said,

    Hello,I just read through your question and I will not hesitate to recommend you to one good loan consultant who helped me when i was in a financial mess some weeks back now.You can contact him via email:chelle_loan_services@yahoo.co.uk and you can be sure of a very transparent and fast loan service.

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