November 29, 2007

Parent’s Frequently Asked Questions

Posted in Misc at 7:42 AM by Joe From Boston


Here are my answers to some questions that many parents ask. They usually start with “I’m paying for his/her education, so why can’t I…?”

Why is the school unable to tell me anything about my student?

Federal law is against you.

According to federal law, college students have the right to the privacy of all their education records including grades, financial information, and disciplinary records.  Though they are your child, they’re really an adult now (even if they don’t act like it), and really, one thing you want them to learn is maturity, right?

Under federal law, parents who want to gain access to a student’s records can do so if the student signs a release form.

Most schools, if not all, do not release information directly to parents.

How can I get a copy of my student’s grades?

The fastest way is to ask your child to see his/her copy.  In many schools, they can log online to check grades and show you.  Otherwise, you’ll need your child to sign a release form.

How can I get verification of my student’s enrollment and GPA for my insurance company?

Check with the school’s Admissions Office.  Each school will have different requirements.  Your child’s signature may be required to release the information (see the first question, above)

How do I get a message to my student?

Your school probably sent information about this to your child in one of the early packets he/she received.  Check this first.  Also check the website.

At my undergraduate school, the central phone number had an operator who could help escalate a call if it was an emergency, for example in the event of a death in the family, the Dean’s office would help track down a student.  I do NOT recommend calling the Dean’s office directly, however!

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1 Comment »

  1. […] unknown had some great ideas on this topic.You can read a snippet of the post here.According to federal law, college students have the right to the privacy of all their education records including grades, financial information, and disciplinary records. Though they are your child, they’re really an adult now (even if … […]


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